Who the Hell are the “Terrorists”?

Pauly Wallnutz May 6, 2013 2

20110503 osamabinladen newspaper 54 Who the Hell are the Terrorists?

The word “terrorism” is used so often nowadays that the term has become so broad, diluted, and vague that just about anyone – foreign or domestic – who disagrees with or stands up against the federal government can be deemed a terrorist. According to the FBI:

“There is no single, universally accepted, definition of terrorism. Terrorism is defined in the Code of Federal Regulations as “the unlawful use of force and violence against persons or property to intimidate or coerce a government, the civilian population, or any segment thereof, in furtherance of political or social objectives”.” (28 C.F.R. Section 0.85)

Now that NDAA has been signed into law, the criteria for being labeled a “terrorist” is so ambiguous that it’s easier than ever to deem individuals, groups, and organizations as “terrorists”. This is especially dangerous, since anyone who meets even some of the criteria can be accused of being a terrorist threat, indefinitely detained without trial, or even assassinated at the discretion of the federal government – more specifically, the President – with no oversight or accountability.

We are living in the Salem Witch Trials of our day and age – except with “terrorists” instead of witches – because of ignorant individuals who assume that anyone who does not align with the status-quo or questions authority is a threat – not to human life as the media would have you believe, but to damaging the collective ego and illusion of how it’s ‘supposed’ to be. All they have to do is accuse individuals or groups of being “terrorists”, and the public will support the capture, assassination, indefinite detention, or any other means of their perceived “justice” – even if it hasn’t been proven true. Guilty until proven innocent is the new system of “justice”.

However, the fact of the matter is that most of the people we label as “terrorists” are retaliating against oppression or defending themselves against the brutality of countries like the United States. We (the US) invade countries, destroy their infrastructure and way of life, loot their resources, bomb and kill their citizens – women, children, wives, mothers, fathers, daughters, sons – among other things. Then, when they rise up in defense of their homeland, loved ones, and their lives, we have the nerve to name them “terrorists”.

They don’t hate us for our freedom – they hate us for the acts of terrorism and atrocities our government and military commit around the world. They hate us for our relentless pursuit of money motivated solely by greed and power, our endless wars, trying to forcefully impose our way of life on them, and acting as the police of the world – getting involved in foreign affairs we have no business being in (other than the business of making profits for the corporate elite).

So, who are the real terrorists? Is drone-bombing, civilian casualties, indefinite detention, and targeted assassination not unlawful use of force and violence? This isn’t about Bush vs Obama, Left vs Right, Islam vs Christianity, or ‘us’ vs ‘them’. It’s about right vs wrong. Terrorism at the hands of the U.S. is still terrorism nonetheless. War – any war – is terrorism. The slaughter of thousands of innocent people and destruction of other countries is disgraceful and unacceptable. Human lives are not collateral damage. This is only creating more terrorists; more individuals who refuse to see the U.S. destroying their homes, killing their loved ones, thus developing a thirst for revenge. Can you blame them? Terrorism will remain prevalent in our society, around the world, and will continue to increase if the United States persists in our current foreign affairs.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=513526038 Eric Altvater

    I disagree with the notion that “most” of the people we label as terrorists are just good guys standing up for their own freedom or what they believe in.

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=513526038 Eric Altvater

    I disagree with the notion that “most” of the people we label as terrorists are just good guys standing up for their own freedom or what they believe in.